ALUMINUM

Aluminum: Even without considering pharmaceutical sources, the typical daily dietary intake of aluminum varies widely, from 3 to 100 mg. Significant sources of aluminum include baked goods prepared with chemical leavening agents (i.e., baking powder), processed cheese, grains, vegetables, herbs and tea. Aluminum toxicity apparently is not a concern for healthy individuals. Cooking foods in aluminum cookware does not lead to detrimental intakes of aluminum. Ingestion of high dietary aluminum most likely does not cause Alzheimer’s disease, but may exacerbate this disease. Moreover, high intakes of aluminum through such sources as buffered analgesics and antacids by susceptible individuals (i.e., those with impaired kidney function including the elderly and low-birth-weight infants) may lead to pathological changes.

 

Minerals
Major Minerals
Calcium
Chloride
Magnesium
Phosphorus
Potassium
Sodium
Sulfur

Trace Minerals

Iodine
Iron
Zinc
Selenium
Fluoride
Chromium
Copper
Manganese
Molybdenum

Other Trace Minerals

Arsenic
Boron
Nickel
Silicon
Other Trace Elements
Aluminum
Bromine
Cadmium
Germanium
Lead
Lithium
Rubidium
Tin
Vanadium

* T. J. Clark Products

Protect yourself and your family, check our Water Distiller

Diseases Information

Bacterial Diseases

Menopause            Andropause

Minerals Information

Vitamins Information

*Weight Loss 

* Health & Beauty

* Healthy Baby

Home Page

T. J. Clark Products  Liquid Vitamins & Minerals, Colloidal Minerals & Specialty Dietary Health Supplements. 

Valeriia.com - Mineral Cosmetic for women, men and children.

Business opportunities with Valeriia

 

* Health-e-Club

 

Diseases&Treatments

Disclaimer: This information is intended as a guide only.   This information is offered to you with the understanding that it not be interpreted as medical or professional advice.  All medical information needs to be carefully reviewed with your health care provider.